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UPDATED VACCINATION RECOMMENDATIONS

BASED ON OFFICIAL AAHA & AAFP GUIDELINES 

​These guidelines are a basic foundation and may not apply to every pet.  We will develop a plan for the specific needs of your pet.

CANINE

WHAT CHANGES?

  • Core vaccinations may be given every 3 years dependent on lifestyle
  • This includes:  Distemper/Adenovirus2/Parvovirus/Rabies

WHAT DOESN’T CHANGE?

  • Vaccinations that are proven to only last 12 to 15 months will still be needed on an annual basis. This includes Lyme/Leptospirosis/Bordetella
  • Heartworm test and fecal examination are recommended yearly
  • Continue heartworm, flea and tick preventatives consistently throughout the year
  • Wellness bloodwork is recommended once a year no matter the age of the pet
  • Annual dental cleaning as needed

FELINE

WHAT CHANGES?

  • Core vaccinations may be given every 3 years dependent on lifestyle, including Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis/Panleukopenia/Calicivirus/Rabies
  • FeLV will only be given every 3 years dependent on lifestyle (recommended annually for outdoor cats)

WHAT DOESN’T CHANGE?

  • Fecal examination is recommended yearly
  • Continue heartworm, flea, and tick preventatives consistently thru out the year
  • FeLV/FIV test is recommended annually (dependent on lifestyle)
  • Wellness bloodwork is recommended once a year no matter the age of the pet
  • Annual dental cleaning as needed

HOW DO I CHANGE MY PET TO THESE RECOMMENDATIONS?

There is no need to call or set up a special appointment for these changes to take place.  At your pet’s next wellness appointment, the doctor will review specific recommendations for your pet.  We will be changing reminders manually so if you receive one that is not correct, please just call.

WHAT ABOUT TITERS?

titer test is a laboratory test measuring the existence and level of antibodies to a particular invading germ in the body.  These tests have been around for a long time, but several questions have consistently limited their use in veterinary medicine. 

1. What is the titer level that means the pet is protected against infection? 
2. Does a low titer level really mean that there is limited immunity in the body since cells are typically primed to make more antibodies when an invader is detected? 

Over the last few years, researchers have been able to determine optimal antibody levels for certain infectious organisms and have developed testing methods that are generally accepted to have good correlation to adequate immunity.  There are a limited number of viral organisms we have the capability to test for, which are generally only used if there is a special circumstance not to vaccinate a pet.    

Titers are not recommended for cat vaccinations.

To make an appointment, please contact us at (405) 533-0001. You can also book an appointment online.

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